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Tag: suspense

BOOK REVIEW: Quantum by Dean de Servienti

Pages: 301, Kindle Edition
Published: June 2017, translated version
Cover Rating: 3/5

I love to find out how sci-fi novelist approach a story. The possibilities of storylines, if you are sci-fi writer, are endless but only researched sci-fi books thrive for a longer period of time and have an ability to entertain a reader. Similar is Dean de Servienti’s upcoming trilogy, Quantum.

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BOOK REVIEW: Messed Up! But all for Love by Arvind Parashar

Messed Up! But all for Love by Arvind Parashar
Genres: Fiction
three-stars

Pages: 176, Paperback
Published: 2017
Cover Rating: 3/5

Arvind Parashar’s latest work Messed Up! But all For Love is a story about love lost between two couples and themselves being tested by their own destiny.

Set in modern India, the story is about a couple, Gauri and Neil who used to lead a happily married life until a series of misfortunes create a void between them, thus, forcing them to pick their own separate ways. These series of misfortunes are displayed through flashbacks to a reader. Trust is often the root of relationships among humans and is showcased very well in this book in various forms.

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three-stars

BOOK REVIEW: The Search of the Myth by Prithviraj Desai

The Search of the Myth by Prithviraj Desai
Genres: Fiction
three-stars

Pages: 256, Paperback
Published: July 2017 by Notion Press
Cover Rating: 4/5

Blend of history with right amount of suspense and adventure.

The adventure starts with an idea of deciphering the context by the protagonist and the surrounding characters in the pages of The Search of the Myth written by Prithviraj Desai who take his readers in the historical times of the Wreck of Grosvernor, sailing ship that used to operate under East India Company in 1780s. This wreck left a secret in the hands of a survivor which was supposed to be delivered to the King of England at that time, but is kept chasing throughout the history.

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three-stars

BOOK REVIEW: Psycon by Varun Tejwani

Psycon by Varun Tejwani
Genres: Fiction
four-stars

Published: April, 2017

Pages: 236

Cover Rating: 4/5

Goodreads | Amazon

When I picked Varun Tejwani’s new book PSYCON, I was amazed by how simple yet curiosity arousing cover filled with darkness. Cover does play an important role in attracting a reader towards the book and conveys the message before any page is flip. I expected the same with the plot of this book.

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four-stars

BOOK REVIEW: Into The Water by Paula Hawkins

Into The Water by Paula Hawkins
Genres: Mystery, Fiction, Thriller
three-stars

Published May, 2017 by Riverhead Books

Pages: 352, Kindle Edition

This could have been the thriller of the year, just like The Girl on the Train, the successful book that came and took our breath away in 2015 which still holds the same essence and qualities of its genre and the power to grab the attention of a reader from page one. On reading Paula Hawkins new book, I do not feel the same.

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three-stars

BOOK REVIEW: Domina by Lisa Hilton

Domina by Lisa Hilton
Genres: Fiction
five-stars

Published in April, 2017

Published in India: May, 2017

Pages 400, Paperback

Judging this book by its cover 4/5

Goodreads | Amazon

Sequel to last year’s “first class thriller” Maestra which sold in more than 43 countries and soon to be turned into a movie is finally out. Written by Lisa Hilton, charmingly, both of her books, Maestra and Domina are in regard of a competitor to Fifty Shades of Grey, another bestseller, but after reading, I think there’s more than Fifty Shades in her books. Her plot creation is full of thrilling effects, and a piece of her imagination equals more than just Fifty Shades.

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five-stars

REVIEW: The Games/Private Rio by James Patterson & Mark Sullivan

The Games by James Patterson, Mark Sullivan
Genres: Fiction, Thriller
four-stars


I am not a fan of Private Series but this book, Private Rio or famously known as The Games has forced me to rethink my paradigm about the series. In past, I have accused James Patterson and his co-authored books being not upto the mark once, or may be more but Private Rio or The Games, if you prefer, definitely raises the bar of my expectations from him and his works.

If you are familiar with Patterson’s style of writing you can rightly expect the chapters being short in format and plot be fast paced to create a sense of thrill among its readers. The idea behind this genre is all about the reader to keep guessing of what will happen next. The novel starts with a prelude though without any mention that takes the reader back in 2014 when FIFA World Cup was held in Brazil where Jack Morgan head of the renowned investigation service PRIVATE is in charge of security of that event. Two years after, Rio is hosting Olympics and Jack Morgan’s Private is again the head of security along with support of Rio’s Police. One thing, I like to compliment the authors on using the real time frame, the FIFA World Cup & the Rio Olympics. It clearly shows a sense of connecting to the reader, a very realistic approach and they have chosen the right moment to release the book.

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four-stars

BOOK REVIEW: Luther- The Calling by Neil Cross

Luther The Calling by Neil Cross
Series: John Luther #1
Genres: Mystery, Fiction, Detective
two-stars

The Calling is the first novel featuring DCI John Luther. Yes, the same Luther you saw on telly as I did, played by Idris Elba. There are so many DC’s and DCI’s the modern British Crime Fiction has produced, so why bother about this one? As usually, he is tortured and that is interesting. Aren’t all?

DCI John Luther has a clearance rate of cases which is extraordinary as it is portrayed by Neil Cross in the telly series too, in the first few episodes. If you have watched the series or/are planning to, you can still read the book. The consequences of this book are what followed by the television series. It’s a prequel.

The plot is simple, John Luther is hunting for a brutal murderer and baby kidnapper who intends to do what he has done again. Now, the most extraordinary thing is there in this simplicity and the credit goes to the author of the book, Neil Cross. The opening scene is do dramatised and there a few more to grab, I feel as if it was a real crime scene in front of me. Every detail is spectacularly written, and very rare in crime fiction novels do you find such generous reception. (more…)

two-stars

BOOK REVIEW: Murder on the Orient Express by Agatha Christie

Murder on the Orient Express by Agatha Christie
Series: Hercule Poirot #10
Genres: Mystery, Fiction, Detective, Classics
three-stars

This one certainly one of the most famous Agatha Christie’s crime tale. Whomsoever I am talking with about crime fiction, does bring up Agatha Christie (even if they haven’t read her). The queen of crime as they like to call her, but Hercule Poirot certainly not the king of detectives.

Murder on the Orient Express is a renowned locked room mystery. A locked room mystery, if elaborated is a crime that sounds impossible to ensue. The plot starts on the famous Orient Express train that promises to take her passengers to a journey across the Europe, but is stuck somewhere in between due to heavy snow. Now this is a real incident, an experience the queen of crime has shared with us, her readers from the memorabilia of her life.

This locked room mystery is based on the whole coach of the Orient Express and Hercule Poirot happens to be in that coach. The deed is done, the culprit runs away and Poirot is given the task of bringing the culprit into the spotlight and by deducing his every move, to satisfy his own curiosity as well as the readers of the book. (more…)

three-stars

Crime and Punishment and Redemption

Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoyevsky
Genres: Fiction, Classics
three-stars

Redemption. We all seek redemption. Most of us are seeking it from our past self for an idealistic future self in various forms. Writing Crime and Punishment for Fyodor Dostoyevsky is a creative redemption from his past and some of his brother, originally titled The Drunkards. Dostoyevsky became fond of this project and rewrote a version of it from scratch, that we take in our hands today and proudly read.

From the start of the novel, the author accomplishes to decipher that the protagonist, Raskolnikov, is tortured by his own thoughts. A student, as many, poverty-stricken, plans an instantaneous murder of an old pawnbroker, thinking it will delay his poverty for few more weeks, completely ignorant of the aftermath and having minimal self-control. This act of morality follows an aftermath which turns out to be psychological for Raskolnikov and the author spots an absolute scenario of what happens after one stands on the brink of insanity using Raskolnikov as his puppet until the protagonist is bring in contact with his own buried conscience and another sufferer. On the engagement of the book and one’s mind, one will indulge in it actively enough as the plot moves forward.

There is suspense in the novel no doubt. Dostoyevsky, in some amount succeeds in the main theme which he tries to revolve around the story: redemption. Characters like Raskolnikov do have a place in a reader’s mind once they have acquired his attention, for longer period of time. But novels like itself, fails to provide strong reasoning for characters who prove to be a drag thoughtout it. I am not going to name a few, you have to read it and judge it for yourself. My assessment is this, when moving forward the path author wants it to and so does the reader, then why a writer like Dostoyevsky would use elements to create a labyrinth, a maze which has no possible point to prove through the novel and does proves to be unnecessary?
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three-stars

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